MINDFULNESS

24. Young Professional. GA Peach. Sharing intelligent wisdom for hungry souls.


If you don’t go after what you want, you’ll never have it. 
If you don’t ask, the answer is always no.
If you don’t step forward, you’re always in the same place. 

-Nora Roberts

“You are free to be here, in touch with life, not manipulated by the ghouls of suffering from events that are over and done.”

—   Thich Nhat Hahn  (via hoopadelic)
True religion is real living; living with all one’s soul, with all one’s goodness and righteousness.
-Albert Einstein

True religion is real living; living with all one’s soul, with all one’s goodness and righteousness.

-Albert Einstein

“Some believe is a soul that persists through change and is the seat to our emotions and thoughts… but becoming mindful of our bodily and mental states teaches us that such states come and go. They do not last. they are impermanent and insubstantial….The second Noble Truth tells us that desire is the cause of suffering. More specifically, it teaches us that selfish desire is the cause of suffering because through it we become attached to things. Once attached to the things we like, we do not want them to change. We want them to remain permanent so that our permanent self can enjoy them. But nothing remains the same, and when things change we are sorrowful. In a word, we suffer. But if there is no self to begin with, if what we call a permanent self or soul is an illusion, then selfish desire and attachment make no sense. It is simply impossible to continue to enjoy pleasant things forever. It is ignorance of our true nature and the true nature of everything - impermanence - that leads to the illusion of a substantial, unchanging self. Suffering is the inevitable result of this ignorance.”

—   Studying Religion by Gary E. Kessler (via woodstockandwonderland)

(Source: elephantcircle)

"A question that sometimes drives me hazy; am i or are the others crazy?"
Albert Einstein

"A question that sometimes drives me hazy; am i or are the others crazy?"

Albert Einstein

seebeyondtheblonde:

Few people are capable of expressing with equanimity opinions which differ from the prejudices of their social environment. Most people are even incapable of forming such opinions.
Albert Einstein

seebeyondtheblonde:

Few people are capable of expressing with equanimity opinions which differ from the prejudices of their social environment. Most people are even incapable of forming such opinions.


Albert Einstein

seebeyondtheblonde:

The Three Universal Truths
1. Nothing is lost in the universe.
Matter turns into energy, energy turns into matter. A dead leaf turns into soil. A seed sprouts and becomes a new plant. Old solar systems disintegrate and turn into cosmic rays. We are born of our parents, our children are born of us.
We are the same as plants, as trees, as other people, as the rain that falls. We consist of that which is around us, we are the same as everything. If we destroy something around us, we destroy ourselves. If we cheat another, we cheat ourselves. Understanding this truth, the Buddha and his disciples never killed any animal.
2. Everything is continuously changing. 
Life is like a river flowing on and on, ever-changing. Sometimes it flows slowly and sometimes swiftly. It is smooth and gentle in some places, but later on snags and rocks crop up out of nowhere. As soon as we think we are safe, something unexpected happens.
Once dinosaurs, mammoths, and saber-toothed tigers roamed this earth. They all died out, yet this was not the end of life. Other life forms like smaller mammals appeared, and eventually humans, too. Now we can even see the Earth from space and understand the changes that have taken place on this planet. Our ideas about life also change. People once believed that the world was flat, but now we know that it is round.
3. Cause and Effect- AKA Karma
The third universal truth explained by the Buddha is that there is continuous changes due to the law of cause and effect.
This is the same law of cause and effect found in every modern science textbook. In this way, science and Buddhism are alike.
The law of cause and effect is known as karma. Nothing ever happens to us unless we deserves it.
We receive exactly what we earn, whether it is good or bad. We are the way we are now due to the things we have done in the past. Our thoughts and actions determine the kind of life we can have. If we do good things, in the future good things will happen to us. If we do bad things, in the future bad things will happen to us.
Every moment we create new karma by what we say, do, and think. If we understand this, we do not need to fear karma. It becomes our friend. It teaches us to create a bright future. 
The Buddha said,
“The kind of seed sown 
will produce that kind of fruit. 
Those who do good will reap good results. 
Those who do evil will reap evil results. 
If you carefully plant a good seed, 
You will joyfully gather good fruit.” 

seebeyondtheblonde:

The Three Universal Truths

1. Nothing is lost in the universe.

Matter turns into energy, energy turns into matter. A dead leaf turns into soil. A seed sprouts and becomes a new plant. Old solar systems disintegrate and turn into cosmic rays. We are born of our parents, our children are born of us.

We are the same as plants, as trees, as other people, as the rain that falls. We consist of that which is around us, we are the same as everything. If we destroy something around us, we destroy ourselves. If we cheat another, we cheat ourselves. Understanding this truth, the Buddha and his disciples never killed any animal.

2. Everything is continuously changing.

Life is like a river flowing on and on, ever-changing. Sometimes it flows slowly and sometimes swiftly. It is smooth and gentle in some places, but later on snags and rocks crop up out of nowhere. As soon as we think we are safe, something unexpected happens.

Once dinosaurs, mammoths, and saber-toothed tigers roamed this earth. They all died out, yet this was not the end of life. Other life forms like smaller mammals appeared, and eventually humans, too. Now we can even see the Earth from space and understand the changes that have taken place on this planet. Our ideas about life also change. People once believed that the world was flat, but now we know that it is round.

3. Cause and Effect- AKA Karma

The third universal truth explained by the Buddha is that there is continuous changes due to the law of cause and effect.

This is the same law of cause and effect found in every modern science textbook. In this way, science and Buddhism are alike.

The law of cause and effect is known as karma. Nothing ever happens to us unless we deserves it.

We receive exactly what we earn, whether it is good or bad. We are the way we are now due to the things we have done in the past. Our thoughts and actions determine the kind of life we can have. If we do good things, in the future good things will happen to us. If we do bad things, in the future bad things will happen to us.

Every moment we create new karma by what we say, do, and think. If we understand this, we do not need to fear karma. It becomes our friend. It teaches us to create a bright future. 

The Buddha said,

“The kind of seed sown 

will produce that kind of fruit. 

Those who do good will reap good results. 

Those who do evil will reap evil results. 

If you carefully plant a good seed, 

You will joyfully gather good fruit.” 

The Noble Eightfold Path
When the Buddha gave his first sermon in the Deer Park, he began the ‘Turning of the Dharma Wheel’.
The Buddha’s teaching goes round and round like a great wheel that never stops, leading to the central point of the wheel, the only point which is fixed, Nirvana.
The eight spokes on the wheel represent the eight parts of the Noble Eightfold Path. Just as every spoke is needed for the wheel to keep turning, we need to follow each step of the path. 
1. Right View. The right way to think about life is to see the world through the eyes of the Buddha—with wisdom and compassion.
2. Right Thought. We are what we think. Clear and kind thoughts build good, strong characters.
3. Right Speech. By speaking kind and helpful words, we are respected and trusted by everyone.
4. Right Conduct. No matter what we say, others know us from the way we behave. Before we criticize others, we should first see what we do ourselves.
5. Right Livelihood. This means choosing a job that does not hurt others. The Buddha said, “Do not earn your living by harming others. Do not seek happiness by making others unhappy.”
6. Right Effort. A worthwhile life means doing our best at all times and having good will toward others. This also means not wasting effort on things that harm ourselves and others.
7. Right Mindfulness. This means being aware of our thoughts, words, and deeds.
8. Right Concentration. Focus on one thought or object at a time. By doing this, we can be quiet and attain true peace of mind.
Following the Noble Eightfold Path can be compared to cultivating a garden, but in Buddhism one cultivates one’s wisdom. 
The mind is the ground and thoughts are seeds. Deeds are ways one cares for the garden. Our faults are weeds. Pulling them out is like weeding a garden. The harvest is real and lasting happiness. 

The Noble Eightfold Path

When the Buddha gave his first sermon in the Deer Park, he began the ‘Turning of the Dharma Wheel’.

The Buddha’s teaching goes round and round like a great wheel that never stops, leading to the central point of the wheel, the only point which is fixed, Nirvana.

The eight spokes on the wheel represent the eight parts of the Noble Eightfold Path. Just as every spoke is needed for the wheel to keep turning, we need to follow each step of the path. 

1. Right View. The right way to think about life is to see the world through the eyes of the Buddha—with wisdom and compassion.

2. Right Thought. We are what we think. Clear and kind thoughts build good, strong characters.

3. Right Speech. By speaking kind and helpful words, we are respected and trusted by everyone.

4. Right Conduct. No matter what we say, others know us from the way we behave. Before we criticize others, we should first see what we do ourselves.

5. Right Livelihood. This means choosing a job that does not hurt others. The Buddha said, “Do not earn your living by harming others. Do not seek happiness by making others unhappy.”

6. Right Effort. A worthwhile life means doing our best at all times and having good will toward others. This also means not wasting effort on things that harm ourselves and others.

7. Right Mindfulness. This means being aware of our thoughts, words, and deeds.

8. Right Concentration. Focus on one thought or object at a time. By doing this, we can be quiet and attain true peace of mind.

Following the Noble Eightfold Path can be compared to cultivating a garden, but in Buddhism one cultivates one’s wisdom. 

The mind is the ground and thoughts are seeds. Deeds are ways one cares for the garden. Our faults are weeds. Pulling them out is like weeding a garden. The harvest is real and lasting happiness. 

Death and Suffering
Once there was a woman named Kisagotami, whose first-born son died.
She was so stricken with grief that she roamed the streets carrying the dead body and asking for help to bring her son back to life. A kind and wise man took her to the Buddha.
The Buddha told her, “Fetch me a handful of mustard seeds and I will bring your child back to life.” Joyfully Kisagotami started off to get them. 
Then the Buddha added, “But the seeds must come from a family that has not known death.”
Kisagotami went from door to door in the whole village asking for the mustard seeds, but everyone said, “Oh, there have been many deaths here”, “I lost my father”, I lost my sister”. 
She could not find a single household that had not been visited by death. 
Finally Kisagotami returned to the Buddha and said, "There is death in every family. Everyone dies. Now I understand your teaching."
The Buddha said, “No one can escape death and unhappiness. If people expect only happiness in life, they will be disappointed.”
Things are not always the way we want them to be, but we can learn to understand them. When we get sick, we go to a doctor and ask—What’s wrong with me? Why am I sick? What will cure me? What do I have to do get well?
The Buddha is like a good doctor.
First a good doctor diagnoses the illness. 
Next he finds out what has caused it. 
Then he decides what the cure is. 
Finally he prescribes the medicine or gives the treatment that will make the patient well again. 

Death and Suffering

Once there was a woman named Kisagotami, whose first-born son died.

She was so stricken with grief that she roamed the streets carrying the dead body and asking for help to bring her son back to life. A kind and wise man took her to the Buddha.

The Buddha told her, “Fetch me a handful of mustard seeds and I will bring your child back to life.” Joyfully Kisagotami started off to get them. 

Then the Buddha added, “But the seeds must come from a family that has not known death.”

Kisagotami went from door to door in the whole village asking for the mustard seeds, but everyone said, “Oh, there have been many deaths here”, “I lost my father”, I lost my sister”.

She could not find a single household that had not been visited by death.

Finally Kisagotami returned to the Buddha and said, "There is death in every family. Everyone dies. Now I understand your teaching."

The Buddha said,No one can escape death and unhappiness. If people expect only happiness in life, they will be disappointed.”

Things are not always the way we want them to be, but we can learn to understand them. When we get sick, we go to a doctor and ask—What’s wrong with me? Why am I sick? What will cure me? What do I have to do get well?

The Buddha is like a good doctor.

First a good doctor diagnoses the illness. 

Next he finds out what has caused it. 

Then he decides what the cure is. 

Finally he prescribes the medicine or gives the treatment that will make the patient well again. 

The Three Universal Truths
1. Nothing is lost in the universe.
Matter turns into energy, energy turns into matter. A dead leaf turns into soil. A seed sprouts and becomes a new plant. Old solar systems disintegrate and turn into cosmic rays. We are born of our parents, our children are born of us.
We are the same as plants, as trees, as other people, as the rain that falls. We consist of that which is around us, we are the same as everything. If we destroy something around us, we destroy ourselves. If we cheat another, we cheat ourselves. Understanding this truth, the Buddha and his disciples never killed any animal.
2. Everything is continuously changing. 
Life is like a river flowing on and on, ever-changing. Sometimes it flows slowly and sometimes swiftly. It is smooth and gentle in some places, but later on snags and rocks crop up out of nowhere. As soon as we think we are safe, something unexpected happens.
Once dinosaurs, mammoths, and saber-toothed tigers roamed this earth. They all died out, yet this was not the end of life. Other life forms like smaller mammals appeared, and eventually humans, too. Now we can even see the Earth from space and understand the changes that have taken place on this planet. Our ideas about life also change. People once believed that the world was flat, but now we know that it is round.
3. Cause and Effect- AKA Karma
The third universal truth explained by the Buddha is that there is continuous changes due to the law of cause and effect.
This is the same law of cause and effect found in every modern science textbook. In this way, science and Buddhism are alike.
The law of cause and effect is known as karma. Nothing ever happens to us unless we deserves it.
We receive exactly what we earn, whether it is good or bad. We are the way we are now due to the things we have done in the past. Our thoughts and actions determine the kind of life we can have. If we do good things, in the future good things will happen to us. If we do bad things, in the future bad things will happen to us.
Every moment we create new karma by what we say, do, and think. If we understand this, we do not need to fear karma. It becomes our friend. It teaches us to create a bright future. 
The Buddha said,
"The kind of seed sown 
will produce that kind of fruit. 
Those who do good will reap good results. 
Those who do evil will reap evil results. 
If you carefully plant a good seed, 
You will joyfully gather good fruit.” 

The Three Universal Truths

1. Nothing is lost in the universe.

Matter turns into energy, energy turns into matter. A dead leaf turns into soil. A seed sprouts and becomes a new plant. Old solar systems disintegrate and turn into cosmic rays. We are born of our parents, our children are born of us.

We are the same as plants, as trees, as other people, as the rain that falls. We consist of that which is around us, we are the same as everything. If we destroy something around us, we destroy ourselves. If we cheat another, we cheat ourselves. Understanding this truth, the Buddha and his disciples never killed any animal.

2. Everything is continuously changing.

Life is like a river flowing on and on, ever-changing. Sometimes it flows slowly and sometimes swiftly. It is smooth and gentle in some places, but later on snags and rocks crop up out of nowhere. As soon as we think we are safe, something unexpected happens.

Once dinosaurs, mammoths, and saber-toothed tigers roamed this earth. They all died out, yet this was not the end of life. Other life forms like smaller mammals appeared, and eventually humans, too. Now we can even see the Earth from space and understand the changes that have taken place on this planet. Our ideas about life also change. People once believed that the world was flat, but now we know that it is round.

3. Cause and Effect- AKA Karma

The third universal truth explained by the Buddha is that there is continuous changes due to the law of cause and effect.

This is the same law of cause and effect found in every modern science textbook. In this way, science and Buddhism are alike.

The law of cause and effect is known as karma. Nothing ever happens to us unless we deserves it.

We receive exactly what we earn, whether it is good or bad. We are the way we are now due to the things we have done in the past. Our thoughts and actions determine the kind of life we can have. If we do good things, in the future good things will happen to us. If we do bad things, in the future bad things will happen to us.

Every moment we create new karma by what we say, do, and think. If we understand this, we do not need to fear karma. It becomes our friend. It teaches us to create a bright future. 

The Buddha said,

"The kind of seed sown 

will produce that kind of fruit. 

Those who do good will reap good results. 

Those who do evil will reap evil results. 

If you carefully plant a good seed, 

You will joyfully gather good fruit.” 

"It is probable that, by the end of the third century B.C., the doctrines of Theravada Buddhism were in essentials much as they are now. The monks taught a dynamic phenomenalism, maintaining that everything in the universe, including the gods and the souls of living beings, was in a constant state of flux. Resistance to the cosmic flux of phenomena, and craving for permanence where permanence could not be found, led to inevitable sorrow. Salvation was to be obtained by the progressive abandonment of the sense of individuality, until it was completely lost in the indescribable state known as Nirvana.”